House Dergholm

Mick Fagan
Posts: 154
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

House Dergholm

Postby Mick Fagan » 06 Nov 2018, 12:44

We were heading to Baillies Rocks, which is in Dergholm State Forest, quite close to the SA border, for a few days last month. As we passed the Dergholm pub, which advertised ice cream, we dropped a cog and did a U turn and pulled up for an ice cream. Upon getting the ice creams and walking around outside the pub, we spied the house opposite the pub, lighting was reasonable, time was on our side, no vehicles parked in front of the house.

Setting up on the other side of the road, minor highway, I pulled the 250mm lens out and came up with this during a moment when the sunshine was sort of there.

This house is so much like my parents house, it isn't funny. If the front door and the back door was open, it was possible to run through using seven steps to go through the entire house. Even the paint scheme, is pretty much the same as their place was.

The bonus was that there was a fire burning, holding up an orange filter to the eye showed that it made the smoke stand out just that bit more.

Shen Hao HZX45-IIA, Fujinon 250 1/30 at f/22, Bergger 400, orange filter, 6mm rise.

I really like this film for stuff like this.

Mick.

180017_House_Dergholm_250_Bergger_400_Orange_Filter_F22_1-30_6mm_Rise_005_Web.jpg

Walter Glover
Posts: 880
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Leichhardt, NSW

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Walter Glover » 07 Nov 2018, 04:59

So much to like and ponder in that one, Mick.

What are you souping your Bergger in? I experimented with some Bergger back in my 8x10 days. It does render a particular feel that I like.

As I recall, I may have tried some of their paper, too.

PS: I do hope that the ice creams were of appropriate for the setting — frozen solid vanilla scooped up from a deep tub set into a stainless steel counter with round covers.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

Mick Fagan
Posts: 154
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Mick Fagan » 07 Nov 2018, 08:07

Walter, agree much to ponder.

As for the ice cream, we had a Magnum, which is an ice cream on a stick. About 5 years ago we were in southern Spain on a hiking holiday and we were given Magnum ice creams as part of a promotional thing in a really tiny hill side village. Apparently the Magnum ice cream was 25 years old and the give aways were part of the celebration. Since that give away, we have probably had a few Magnum ice creams on various holidays each year; we don't eat ice cream at home, so it is a real treat when on a holiday.

I would suggest that the Bergger film you may have used in the past, is certainly different to what is available today. The current film, called Bergger Pancro 400 is quite a different film from anything I can remember using. It has two distinct speed coatings, as I understand it, the idea being to hold deep shadow detail as well as light highlights. Other films I know have the same thing and do the same thing, but not, it seems to me, as well as this Bergger film.

It really is a nice film to print, nice to scan as well; which I'm finding out as I scan many of my films these days to share on fora like this one.

As for developer, mature D76 1:1. Mature, means the developer is at least a week old and could be anything up to six months old. Over time I found I seemed to get better negatives from older developer, with the advent of the internet I was able to do some digging and found out that matured D76 did in fact change slightly as it matured, compared to fresh developer. I mix my chemistry from scratch, have been doing that for the last 30+ years. At times I have used developer so fresh I was waiting for it to cool directly from mixng before using. These days I keep a couple of litres in stock, in fact after this morning session on the net, I'm heading to the darkroom to mix up another 1 1/2 litres to replace what I have used this past week.

I've been using Ilford FP4+ since it's inception, it is my work horse film and one I know quite well. I picked up a few boxes of Bergger Pancro 400 when it was released in Australia, it has become my go to film for interesting shadowy subjects, as well as portraiture. The 5x4" version comes in 50 sheet boxes, which is the right size for me; I cannot stand the 25 sheet Ilford stuff (which is why I buy the 100 sheet boxes from the USA), as for kodak and their 10 sheet boxes of some films.....

Mick.

Walter Glover
Posts: 880
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Leichhardt, NSW

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Walter Glover » 07 Nov 2018, 09:03

Mick,

Where are you sourcing the Bergger in Aust?
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

Mick Fagan
Posts: 154
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Mick Fagan » 07 Nov 2018, 16:36

Walter, from Gold Street Studios, which is near Daylesford in rural Victoria, about 1 hour west of Melbourne.

http://www.goldstreetstudios.com.au/pho ... o400sheet/

The 50 sheet box is the cheapest way to purchase it, as you'll soon see.

Mick.

User avatar
Maris
Posts: 509
Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Maris » 11 Nov 2018, 09:57

The place has obviously been art-directed? Every detail has a twist or "kicker" to entertain the eye: smoking chimney, air-con on the wall, satellite dish above the roof ridge, disasterously tilted verandah roof, gap-tooth picket fence, long term trailer parking....and it goes on. At least it's a short walk to the Menzies Hotel over the road. A few beers with rum chaser and worries about overdue renovations can be put aside.
Well seen Mick.

Mick Fagan
Posts: 154
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: House Dergholm

Postby Mick Fagan » 11 Nov 2018, 19:24

Thanks Maris.

It certainly is an interesting house. When my in-laws came to Australia from Germany around 30+ years ago, we stopped in our Kombi Kamper for a drink. While walking around stretching our legs my mother in-law mentioned words to the effect, "why do they leave houses like that standing"? She refused to believe people were living in houses like that, in a country like Australia.

Once the question was translated to me, I suggested that maybe my wife's mother should be let down gently and maybe an explanation of some kind should be given as the house she was going to visit in a short time, was worse than what she was looking at. In fact, this house looks in about the same condition in all aspects of my parents house.

My mother in-law was incredulous, didn't really believe what she had been told, until, that is, we pulled up outside my parents house. She looked at her husband and uttered two words, "mein Gott"; I didn't need a translation.

Mick.


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