Epiphyte, White Wood.

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Maris
Posts: 524
Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Epiphyte, White Wood.

Postby Maris » 27 Nov 2018, 11:12

Image
Epiphyte, White Wood

Gelatin-silver photograph on Agfa MCC 111 VC FB photographic paper, image size 24.6cm X 19.5cm, from a 8x10 Kodak Tmax 400 negative exposed in a Tachihara 810HD triple extension field view camera fitted with a Fujinon-W 300mm f5.6 lens.

Mick Fagan
Posts: 171
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: Epiphyte, White Wood.

Postby Mick Fagan » 28 Nov 2018, 17:21

Quite a nice rendition of the trunks, funnily enough, those trunks look like they belong to a dead tree, yet, unlike a parasite, an epiphyte doesn't live off and possibly be the demise of the host.

Nice one there Maris.

Even allowing for the fact you are using a 300mm, it looks as though you are reasonably close, any extra exposure for bellows extension?

Mick.

Walter Glover
Posts: 888
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Leichhardt, NSW

Re: Epiphyte, White Wood.

Postby Walter Glover » 29 Nov 2018, 05:34

To quote a sage hero of mine:
" One should photograph objects, not only for what they are but for what else they are."
— Minor White

So here, for me, are symbiotic forms, perhaps unwittingly forming a classic icon through which we can view other realities, or our own reality.

Love it Maris!!
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

User avatar
Maris
Posts: 524
Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Re: Epiphyte, White Wood.

Postby Maris » 29 Nov 2018, 10:50

Thanks Mick and Walter. The sun-bleached dead tree was in the Noosa National Park just over my back fence. The forms were mildly elegant but needed a "kicker". One summer the little plant emerged from the hollow in the tree and completed the scene. Just like a dot turns a line into an exclamation mark!

Exposure compensation? There was a bit. Exposed Tmax 400 at E.I. 200 so there's a stop. Placed white wood on Zone VIII so three stops more. And then a stop more for the bellows extension. That's 5 stops over a straight reading from my Sekonic L-758D (mercifully accurate) light-meter. Large format film loves to eat light. Under-exposure is irretrievably fatal.


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