new member introduction

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RoganJosh
Posts: 199
Joined: 29 Aug 2012, 11:26

Re: new member introduction

Postby RoganJosh » 21 Oct 2013, 16:40

Walter Glover wrote:Yaw has nothing to do with the need to refocus after applying tilt. Yaw is about the perpendicularity of the swing axis. All the Sinars were designed to eradicate yaw - I understand that Arca Swiss effectively addressed the issue also.


My mistake, I had the two mixed up.
Cameras that are 'yaw-free' have base tilt on the lens plane rather than axis tilt, which alleviates problems when trying to using swings on an inclined rail/camera bed. It's also caused by the order of tilt and swing joints on the standard.

Having 'yaw' eliminates the need to refocus when your using tilt on its own, which is what I was trying to get across. That's far more handy to me than being yaw-free :)

Walter Glover
Posts: 911
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Canterbury, NSW

Re: new member introduction

Postby Walter Glover » 21 Oct 2013, 19:52

Hi Rogan Josh,

I don't think you are quite on the same page with regard to Yaw, so please let me give you something to ponder on.

The Sinar F2 has base tilt and the P2 has asymetric tilt placed below the lens axis but above the bottom of the lens standard.

Sticking to the F2, when you apply tilt the lens comes either closer to, or further from the film plane. This necessitates refocussing.

Even with so-called 'axis tilt', such as on my Linhof the pivot is very rarely at the rear nodal point of the optical formula and so refocussing is usually called for then, also.

Yaw is a different kettle of fish. With yaw the swing axis is no longer perpendicular to the tilt axis and so the resulting plane of sharpest focus becomes oblique which throws out of whack the geometry of the projected image.

I hope you find this helpful.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

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RoganJosh
Posts: 199
Joined: 29 Aug 2012, 11:26

Re: new member introduction

Postby RoganJosh » 22 Oct 2013, 00:24

If anyone is still interested please follow the link http://www.sinar.ch/en/yaw-free/

And yes walter if the tilt does not occur precisely on the lens axis then you will need to refocus.

Now's my chance, i'm gonna make a break for the 35mm forums!

smbooth
Posts: 405
Joined: 29 Jul 2012, 00:20

Re: new member introduction

Postby smbooth » 24 Oct 2013, 16:44

Sometimes its more Yawn, then Yaw

alex gard
Posts: 110
Joined: 14 Oct 2013, 21:18

Re: new member introduction

Postby alex gard » 11 Nov 2013, 09:10

Received my sinar last week. its so pretty and the weight isnt so bad. certainly manageable

just waiting on lens board and film holders. taking waaaay too long :(

Walter Glover
Posts: 911
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Canterbury, NSW

Re: new member introduction

Postby Walter Glover » 11 Nov 2013, 09:21

Great news Alex,

Perhaps you could use the waiting time to familiarise yourself with the controls. Especially mounting it on a tripod and settling the horizon level — it you have the older style rail clamp you may find that as you tighten it there is a tendency to pull the top of the camera slightly clockwise (if you have the tightening handle at positioned on the right hand side).
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

alex gard
Posts: 110
Joined: 14 Oct 2013, 21:18

Re: new member introduction

Postby alex gard » 22 Nov 2013, 23:25

thanks walter. Yes I've been playing around with it. My dark bag arrived today meaning I could finally load up some film (what a pain!) and go out for a quick shoot before the sun set. using the camera was a little trickier than i thought but I'm sure with time i'll get the hang of it. having the lens open to 5.6 to compose roughly before stopping down to my desired aperture of 16. i had limited lines and the biggest thing i want to familiarise myself with was converging verticals. a bit limited with the subject but i did my best with a little front rise and some rear shift. will see how it turns out. was a 3:30 ish exposure on fuji acros 100.

in the process of acquiring developing stuff and scanner so will fire off another 4 shots and develop some on my mod54 reel and post back results whenever that happens.

Also I found that when I removed the bellows and collapsed the two standards kind of like tetris with the bellows in between they wrapped up well in my dark cloth and fitted into an old laptop bag. the monorail stays on the tripod but it could easily fit in the bag on top of the camera. i'm in no rush though. the weight isn't back breaking but i doubt i'd be hiking around all day with it on my shoulder, if I spent some money on a good back pack I reckon i would hike for a few hours with it though. my hasselblad bag is really not that much lighter than this especially with the tripod. the old 'vintage' sinar tripod head i got off ebay is heavy as hell (and not that great in movements tbh, I should have gone for a ball head)

great fun though lookforward to getting out more and flogging it.

Image

Image

Walter Glover
Posts: 911
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Canterbury, NSW

Re: new member introduction

Postby Walter Glover » 25 Nov 2013, 05:25

Sorry for the delay getting back to you Alex,

A couple of pointers based on your pic of the kit and some of your comments.

    There are no set rules, but I feel the camera would handle better on the tripod if you lifted the rail out of the rail clamp and turned the camera end for end. Generally, having the clamping knob for the rail clamp on the right hand side is comfortable. And having the lens end of the camera over the hinge of the pan tilt head allows you to go to 90º tilt down for copying.


    I find that the Sinars work incredibly well on the Sinar pan/Tilt head. It locks off incredibly firmly with no play. You only need to be able to pan and tilt with it because the tubular rail in the rail clamp permits levelling the horizon. The head is compact and strong and Foba (who make it I believe) use materials as gaskets that grip and don't let go.


    What appears to be missing from your rig is a little plastic angle piece that clamps into the vertical channel at the side of the front standard and protrudes beyond the edge of the lens board to prevent inadvertently having the lens and panel fall forward out of the frame in the event that the locking lever is released.


    Slide the rail fore and aft through the rail clamp to find the best balance for the lens and bellows extension you have. Slight adjustments in tilt are far easier when the camera is near equilibrium.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

alex gard
Posts: 110
Joined: 14 Oct 2013, 21:18

Re: new member introduction

Postby alex gard » 02 Dec 2013, 21:28

Thanks for the tips, although the rail has a squared smaller metal rail on the top side that i assume is there to stop the camera from falling sideways and hitting the tripod. So i have been adjusting the tripod legs if i need to level it. Im not a great problem solver so im sure there is an easier way (like wow just writing this im thinking "have i even tried to take the squAred rail off altogether?" christ I'm dumb sometimes)

Walter Glover
Posts: 911
Joined: 31 Jul 2012, 22:31
Location: Canterbury, NSW

Re: new member introduction

Postby Walter Glover » 02 Dec 2013, 21:41

Don't remove the metal ridge. It is there to provide a locking ridge for the rail clamp.

To set the camera level, hold it with one hand as you release pressure on the long handle that sticks out from the rail clamp. Once the tension is relaxed enough to allow steady movement, set the camera level by checking the spirit level and then clamp tight again.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi


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