Exposure metering

Light, film, exposure..
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Waltzing Paul
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Exposure metering

Postby Waltzing Paul » 31 May 2013, 22:03

Hi, is it possible to use a 35mm digital camera to work out the exposure for LF camera.
I mean is using the same speed/iso setting of the 4x5 film - will this give me the correct exposure?
How about taking the reading from the ground glass?
I'm getting ready for my first LF photo session using 4x5 so any help would be welcome.
Thanks, Paul.
Paul

The pictures you want tomorrow, you have to take today". - Anonymous - Kodak advertisement

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Alastair Moore
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Alastair Moore » 01 Jun 2013, 13:20

Waltzing Paul wrote:Hi, is it possible to use a 35mm digital camera to work out the exposure for LF camera.
I mean is using the same speed/iso setting of the 4x5 film - will this give me the correct exposure?
How about taking the reading from the ground glass?
I'm getting ready for my first LF photo session using 4x5 so any help would be welcome.
Thanks, Paul.


You certainly can use a digital camera to measure exposure. I know a few people do but for me a good light meter is hard to beat. Not so sure about metering off the ground glass, although I believe Sinar make a metering back of some description.

Lachlan717
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Lachlan717 » 01 Jun 2013, 18:16

One word of (semi) warning:

Don't rely on the digi's Histogram as the guide to exposure. Digital capture CAN vary from film enough to ruin an image.

If you use a decent DSLR purely as a spot meter, there should be no issue. A lot of people start off doing this way, but seem to go with a dedicated meter/spot meter as it is so much smaller and lighter than an SLR.

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Waltzing Paul
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Location: Brisbane, Qld

Re: Exposure metering

Postby Waltzing Paul » 01 Jun 2013, 21:55

Thanks for the replies.
So it looks like I should be ok using my DSLR.
I actually ferreted out my old Weston Master universal meter (circa 1942) and tested it in the garden against my DSLR and it was spot on - amazing.
I'll have to give it a go as well. As you say much better than lugging a DSLR around.
I'm still waiting for my LF camera to arrive from Germany but shouldn't be too long now.
Let you know how I get on.

Paul
Paul

The pictures you want tomorrow, you have to take today". - Anonymous - Kodak advertisement

Lachlan717
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Lachlan717 » 02 Jun 2013, 06:22

Is the Western a spot meter?

If you're thinking about using a version if The Zone System, the SLR might be a better option in the short term.

Walter Glover
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Walter Glover » 02 Jun 2013, 06:33

Ansel used the Weston to do his own evaluations of Archer's Zone System. Nothing wrong with a Weston in good light. The selenium cell isn't crash hot in low light.

Later Westons had Zone System markings on the dial calculators and they added the 'Invercone' for incident readings. Phil Davis' BYZS explains great technique for incident readings. Takes some of the guess work out of zone placement.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

smbooth
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby smbooth » 03 Jun 2013, 09:05

Ive always thought that if you do some testing by using a small digital and then bracket a few frame of film you could determine any offset between the two. Then just apply the difference when making images on film.
I cannot see the sense of carting a full blown DSLR around for it, a meter is lighter. But a small pocket DC could work out.

Walter Glover
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Walter Glover » 03 Jun 2013, 10:15

I must admit that I was surprised to see just how consistently accurate the the Pocket Light Meter app on the iPhone is. Functions as a sort of spot meter.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi

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Waltzing Paul
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Re: Exposure metering

Postby Waltzing Paul » 03 Jun 2013, 15:49

Yes, the Weston is a good meter but not a spot meter.
How much of an advantage is that to have a spot meter?
Probably better for high contrast scenes I guess.
Paul

The pictures you want tomorrow, you have to take today". - Anonymous - Kodak advertisement

Walter Glover
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Location: Canterbury, NSW

Re: Exposure metering

Postby Walter Glover » 03 Jun 2013, 19:13

If you follow Phil Davis's BTZS method the incident meter will be as goodf or better than a spot meter.
Walter Glover

"Photography was not a bastard left by science on the doorstep of art, but a legitimate child of the Western pictorial tradition." —Robert Galassi


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