Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Making your print in the darkroom
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Maris
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Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Postby Maris » 26 Jul 2014, 16:30

Image
Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.
A digital picture illustrating wet 8x10 fibre base gelatin-silver photographs laid out six at a time on mesh drying screens. The screens are of the same materials as insect screens.

The photographs dry gently over a day or so and are then flattened at 90 Celcius in the dry mount press in the foreground. Any trimming is done with the precision guillotine next to the press on the bench. A fine photograph may be framed and hung. Some wall-space is available.

smbooth
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Joined: 29 Jul 2012, 00:20

Re: Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Postby smbooth » 25 Aug 2014, 13:42

You look to organised..

Do you over-matte your prints , ie cover the print edge, or open them out 10mm or so so you can see the print edge?

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Maris
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Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Re: Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Postby Maris » 26 Aug 2014, 09:17

Here's one of the pictures from the nearest drying screen:
Image
Snow Gum, Kangaroo Ridge, Infrared

Gelatin-silver photograph on Ultrafine Silver Eagle photographic paper, image size 19.5cm X 24.6cm, from a 8x10 Efke IR820 negative exposed in a Tachihara 810HD triple extension field view camera fitted with a Wollensak 159mm f9.5 lens and IR680 filter. Exposure time was 20 minutes at f22.
Titled, signed, and stamped verso.

This example shows the result of a 8x10 negative contacted onto 8x10 photographic paper. The black "verification border" resulting from the clear edge rebate of the negative exhibits subtle emulsion chipping. Emulsion edge chipping happens in ordinary processing but it is essentially invisible when the edge is white. For this image I cut an over-mat that hides the black border and 1 millimetre of actual picture all round. The full over-mat is preferred in many galleries. The photograph is titled and signed on the back (verso) and a separate wall card conveys the catalogue details.

When I want to assert the complete picture, black border and all, I'll contact the negative into the middle of an 11x14 sheet of photographic paper. Then the over-mat is cut to leave (say) 10mm of white space at the top and sides and 15mm at the bottom. The bottom space is convenient for titling and signing directly on the face (recto) of the photograph.

I suspect there are as many matting and framing preferences as there are photograph makers.

smbooth
Posts: 405
Joined: 29 Jul 2012, 00:20

Re: Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Postby smbooth » 27 Aug 2014, 07:29

Yes , I suspect your right.
Nice to see somebody getting results with IR820, everytime I use it lately it underexposed , I starting to think my filter is stronger then 720 cut off.

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Alastair Moore
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Re: Wet Photographs on Drying Screens.

Postby Alastair Moore » 02 Sep 2014, 09:03

That's a cracking photograph, Maris!


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