Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.

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Maris
Posts: 890
Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.

Postby Maris » 01 Jan 2023, 09:10

Image
Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.
Gelatin-silver photograph on Agfa Classic VC FB photographic paper, image size 24.7cm X 19,3cm, from a Kodak 8x10 T-Max 400 negative
exposed in a Tachihara 810HD field view camera fitted with a Fujinon-W 300mm f5.6 lens.

Harry Spring constructed his cabin of local timber long long ago but in the spirit of the times the kitchen, always a fire hazard, was built off to the side and of corrugated iron.

Mick Fagan
Posts: 422
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.

Postby Mick Fagan » 06 Jan 2023, 14:16

Hmm, architecture that I grew up with; love it.

Looks like it is attached to the house/cabin via some kind of timber and tin roofing; bit of a no no that regarding fire to the house prevention.

A nice flat(ish) day allowing you to get shadow detail on the darker sections of the orb iron.

User avatar
Maris
Posts: 890
Joined: 27 Jul 2012, 16:02
Location: Noosa

Re: Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.

Postby Maris » 16 Jan 2023, 13:35

Mick, your comment on the fire hazard of Harry Spring's detached kitchen intrigued me. The original cooking arrangement was apparently just a stone circle fireplace with a couple of camp ovens. A local historian explained that the thing that worked against a general conflagration was the really steep pitch of the kitchen roof. This would catch any smoke or spark emissions and rapidly convect them to the chimney structure at the back.
I live and learn!

Mick Fagan
Posts: 422
Joined: 24 Sep 2015, 21:20
Location: Melbourne

Re: Harry Spring's Kitchen, Noosa Everglades.

Postby Mick Fagan » 16 Jan 2023, 18:20

I see, that certainly makes sense. I must admit all of the kitchens I was in as a kid in the sticks, didn't have that kind of roof or chimney structure; or at least I don't remember them.

My uncle Ted had a bush house and a kitchen out the back, which also housed the copper boiler for washing. I remember a couple other people living in the sticks with their kitchens out the back as well, most I would suggest were built around 1880's to the 1920's, things started to get modern after then.

I remember reading On our Selection by Steele Rudd in the fifties and thinking that it was a fairly good description of many places and happenings that I knew about, either from stories from my elders, or what I had lived through as a kid in the sticks.

Yes, always learning.


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